Welcome to the Psycholinguistics Laboratory at the University of Zürich

The Psycholinguistics Laboratory is part of the Department of Comparative Linguistics. Our main mission is to understand the psychological foundations of language from a comparative point of view. Linguistic diversity is ubiquitous and the prerequisite of understanding how language works is to understand the role of diversity. Our goal is to find out how linguistic diversity influences processes in the brain and how languages of extreme diversity can be learned by children. Currently the laboratory has 2 main research areas:

 

The Psycholinguistics Laboratory is headed by Sabine Stoll.

News

  • Why do children learn some words more quickly than others? Caroline Rownland presents a talk on this question at the colloquium of the Department of Comparative Linguistics (March 24, 10:15).

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  • The Psycholinguistics Laboratory (Department of Comparative Linguistics) and the research group Developmental Psychology: Infancy and Childhood (Department of Psychology) offer three PhD positions in an SNF project titled "The role of causality in early verb learning: language-specific factors vs. universal strategies" that is scheduled to start in late 2017. Find more details in the job ad.

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  • Caroline Remensberger has started working in ACQDIV as a student assistant. She was already involved in the analysis of Dënë Sųłınë́ earlier and took a break to focus on her studies. Now we're happy to welcome her back on the glossing team.

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  • Dagmar Jung will present two talks related to DESLAS at the ICLDC 5 (March 2-5) and the Comput-EL workshop (March 6-7) in Honolulu, Hawai'i. The first talk (with Mark Klein and Olga Lovick) is titled "Keeping language in place: from Dene transitional-immersion at school to a local Dene teacher education program", the second (with Gary Holton, Nick Thieberger, Sebastian Drude, and Michael Rießler) "Developing collection management tools to create more robust and reliable linguistic data".

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  • Dagmar Jung has been invited for a talk at the University of Melbourne, which will be titled "Transcription as family affair: representing variation in the Dene language acquisition study." The talk will be held on February 17, 2017.

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